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VideoQuartets << New Pathways in Science
Science and the Spirit (#Q114)
SCIENCE AND SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS
Charles Tart

Western science and traditional spiritual practice are both dedicated to the search for truth. Charles Tart, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of California at Davis and author of States of Consciousness and Transpersonal Psychologies, suggests that in the future we may be able to specify which types of individuals are likely to benefit most from particular spiritual disciplines.
VALUE AND PURPOSE IN SCIENCE
Arthur M. Young

Consciousness, rather than being a property which "emerges" at higher orders of complexity, is a basic principle intrinsic to every level of creation, according to this stimulating program with the late philosopher Arthur M. Young. Inventor of the Bell Helicopter and founder of the Institute for the Study of Consciousness, Young's books include The Reflexive Universe, The Geometry of Meaning and Which Way Out.
SCIENCE AND RELIGION
Willis Harman

While conventional religion and science are often in conflict, says Willis Harman, Ph.D., there is a growing convergence between non-reductionistic science and internally oriented religious traditions. The late Dr. Harman, president of the Institute of Noetic Sciences and author of Higher Creativity and An Incomplete Guide to the Future, points out that this movement reflects an important new area of public interest.
BEYOND THE POST-MODERN MIND
Huston Smith

The modern western worldview is dominated by the materialist values of science. According to Huston Smith, Ph.D., this withdrawal of emphasis from human values--and from essential elements such as meaning, quality and purpose--has lead to widespread alienation and social discontent. Dr. Smith is a former professor of religion at M.I.T. and author of The Religions of Man and Beyond the Post-Modern Mind.
$69.95  $49.95
Four complete programs
120 minutes


"Nature is full of values. Protons like electrons. Protons don't like other protons; they repel one another. How do you explain this? How do you describe attraction? In order to describe attraction, you can't do it conceptually. You have to say, "Well, it's like I'm attracted to
a beautiful girl."
--Arthur M. Young 




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